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Liberal Left Don Hajibs at Women’s March to Show Solidarity with Extremism

Liberal Left Don Hajibs at Women’s March to Show Solidarity with Extremism

Liberal Left Don Hajibs at Women’s March to Show Solidarity with Extremism
January 31
19:04 2017

Why were protesters wearing hijabs?

The dark, powerful, hidden force behind the Women’s March on D.C.

 

Published: 7 days ago

Garth Kant

WASHINGTON – They gathered by the thousands to watch history on television.

They cheered wildly when President Trump said in his inaugural address that the U.S. will eradicate radical Islamic terrorism from the face of the earth.

The next day, they looked on in shock and horror at the violent protests in the streets. They were even more horrified when they saw American women wearing hijabs, Muslim headscarves worn as a sign of piety.

But this wasn’t Kansas. It wasn’t even the Midwest. It was the Middle East.

Cairo, Egypt. Home to tens of millions of devout Muslims.

Cheri Berens saw it first hand.

From her vantage point, “The entire coffee shop gasped in disbelief at the vision of American women donning the headscarf.”

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Berens is an American who has lived in Cairo for years working as a researcher for the Egyptian Ministry of Culture. She witnessed the violence that preceded the takeover of the country by the radical Muslim Brotherhood and the counter-revolution that removed it from power.

Berens is author of “Cheri’s Memoir: An American Woman Living in Egypt” and is working on her next book, “The Cultural History of Egypt.”

And, in an essay on her blog titled “Women’s March to Islam?” she chronicled how for everyday Egyptians watching on television, packed into “every coffee shop in Cairo that had a satellite dish,” the scenes in the streets of Washington, D.C., were disturbingly familiar.

They recognized the same methods the Muslim Brotherhood used for decades to finally seize control in Egypt playing out in the American capital.

“First we saw protesters smashing windows and torching cars,” wrote Berens.

“Hushed murmuring began around me as every single Egyptian in the coffee shop could be heard saying the words: ‘Muslim Brotherhood.’”

She observed: “The images we were watching could have been taken right from a street in Egypt. It is exactly what we had experienced on a daily basis for more than a year.”

While the violence stunned the Egyptians, it was American women wearing hijabs that evoked agitation and even anger.

“We have been fighting to remove the headscarf. Why are these the stupid women putting them on?” asked an Egyptian woman within earshot of Berens.

Indeed, it is a question many have asked: Why would American women, and even the homosexual community, make common cause with those who would strip them of their rights and civil liberties?

WND put that question to former U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., who once introduced legislation to designate the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist organization and who observed that the question of why collaboration occurs among disparate causes comes up often.

“People understand Islam abhors homosexuality, yet they often join forces in protests with gay activists,” she told WND. “The answer is simple, Black Lives Matters, the gay agenda, as well as Islamic supremacism, all seek domination over American freedoms.”

Still, why collaborate?

“They cannot reach their aims separately, but they can realize the fall of individual liberties if they work together. Once liberties fall, the groups break with each other in a race to impose their particular views on the American populace,” Bachmann explained.

“Causing liberties to fall is a long-term project, and they will use whatever allies they can get to realize that phase of their goals,” she concluded.

That strategy seemed apparent in what Berens observed.

Berens remarked how no one would ever think of damaging someone’s car or business before 2012, the year the Muslim Brotherhood took power in Egypt.

But after that, “mobs of Muslim brotherhood would ‘protest’ in the streets, ripping apart public and private property and disabling normal activity – just as we were now watching on TV.”

“Some of the ‘protesters’ even covered their faces in the exact same way the Muslim brotherhood do.”

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